European Regional Focal Point for Animal Genetic Resources (ERFP)

The European Regional Focal Point for Animal Genetic Resources (ERFP) is the regional platform to support the in situ and ex situ conservation and sustainable use of animal genetic resources and to facilitate the implementation of FAO's Global Plan of Action for Animal Genetic Resources in Europe.

  • 31.10.2014 -

    Reminder: 8th Session of the Intergovernmental Technical Working Group on Animal Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture

    The Eighth Session of the Intergovernmental Technical Working Group on Animal Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture will be held at FAO Headquarters in Rome from 26-28 November 2014. The opening meeting will begin at 9.30 on Wednesday, 26 November 2014. The Session is being convened under the Regular Pro-gramme of the Organization. Simultaneous translations in Arabic, English, French and Spanish will be available. (more information)[more]


  • 08.09.2014 -

    Preparatory action on EU plant and animal genetic resources in agriculture

    This study has been commissioned by the European Commission. The objectives are to identify, describe and analyze the activities on the conservation and sustainable use of agricultural and forest genetic resources and to identify missing links and actions to be addressed in future actions. The first task is a mapping exercise, aiming at identifying and listing initiatives, existing databases, collections and their corresponding key stakeholders. Therefore the Information and Coordination Centre for Biological Diversity (IBV) of the German Federal Office for Agriculture and Food (BLE), as a subcontracter, will ask the National Coordinators of the EU Member States for contact information of...[more]


  • 25.08.2014 -

    Scrapie reduction unlikely without effective breeding programme

    Over the last ten years experts of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) have monitored scrapie in sheep and goats. They came to the conclusion that an eradication policy that relies only on the detection and culling of infected flocks and does not include breeding programmes for resistance is unlikely to succeed.(more information)[more]